Andrew Lumsden

Andrew Lumsden

Emeritus Professor, Group Leader



Biography:

Andrew Lumsden FRS FMedSci was born in 1947. He was the founder of the MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology in 2000 and its Director until 2012. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society, the Academy of Medical Sciences, and King’s College London, and a member of the European Molecular Biology Organization. Andrew Lumsden graduated from St. Catharine's College in the University of Cambridge and completed his PhD in Developmental Biology at the University of London. He held various lectureships at Guy’s Hospital Medical School and the United Medical Schools of Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospital before being made a full Professor of the University of London in 1989. He has been an International Scholar of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (1993–1998) and a Miller Institute visiting Professor at the University of California, Berkeley (1994). He served on the Medical Research Council Neurosciences and Mental Health Board and Grants Committee (1992—1998), the Wellcome Trust Neuroscience Funding Committee (1997—2000), and the Brain Functions Grant Review Committee of the Human Frontier Science Program (1998—2001). He was also editor of Development (1995—2007) and is co-founder of the on-line, open-access journal Neural Development. In addition, Andrew Lumsden is a co-Head of Section for Faculty of 1000.

Links:

Thompson Reuters Researcher ID: C-5146-2009
KCL PURE: https://kclpure.kcl.ac.uk/portal/andrew.lumsden.html

Selected publications:

Graham A, Butts T, Lumsden A, Kiecker C (2014) What can vertebrates tell us about segmentation? Evodevo 5: 24
Gilthorpe JD, Oozeer F, Nash J, Calvo M, Bennett DLH, Lumsden A, Pini A (2013) Extracellular histone H1 is neurotoxic and drives a pro-inflammatory response in microglia F1000Research 2:148
Fassier C, Hutt JA, Scholpp S, Lumsden A, Giros B, Nothias F, Schneider-Maunoury S, Houart C, Hazan J (2010) Zebrafish atlastin controls motility and spinal motor axon architecture via inhibition of the BMP pathway. Nat Neurosci 13: 1380-7