Anthony Graham

Anthony Graham

Professor of Developmental Biology, Group Leader, Education Leader
Chair of the Exam Board for Anatomy, Developmental and Human Biology



Biography:

Anthony Graham is a developmental biologist with a long standing interest in the formation and evolution of the vertebrate head. He was born in Glasgow, Scotland in 1965 and graduated in Molecular Biology (BSc) from the University of Glasgow in 1986. He then moved to conduct his doctoral work at the National Institute for Medical Research, Mill Hill London under the supervision of Dr Robb Krumlauf, where he worked on the then newly discovered Hox genes and was awarded his PhD from University College London in 1990. His doctoral studies were followed by a period of post-doctoral research with Professor Andrew Lumsden at UMDS, now incorporated into King’s College London. In 1995, he established his own laboratory and has since that time devoted his attention to the study of the development and evolution of the pharyngeal region with a particular emphasis on the deployment of the neural crest, neurogenic placodes and pharyngeal endoderm. Anthony Graham’s work is marked by its exploration of developmental biology within clear anatomical and evolutionary contexts. This work has yielded many highly cited papers and has been influential in the field.

Anthony Graham is a member of a number of Editorial Boards and is currently Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Anatomy

Links:

Thompson Reuters Researcher ID: B-1864-2008
KCL PURE: https://kclpure.kcl.ac.uk/portal/anthony.graham.html

Related News:

The elusive fifth pharyngeal arch

16/09/19
Rethinking the numbering of the amniote pharyngeal arches

Selected publications:

Muraina IA, Bury NR, Scott A, Graham A, Hogstrand C (2020) The zebrafish Znt1asa17 mutant reveals roles of zinc transporter-1a in embryonic development. J Trace Elem Med Biol 60: 126496
Subathra Poopalasundaram, Jo Richardson, Annabelle Scott, Alex Donovan, Karen Liu and Anthony Graham (2019) Diminution of pharyngeal segmentation and the evolution of the amniotes Zoological Letters 5:6