Ivo Lieberam

Ivo Lieberam

Senior Lecturer, Group Leader



Biography:

Dr Ivo Lieberam joined King?s College London (KCL) in 2009 and moved to the Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine in 2015. During his PhD thesis in Prof Klaus Rajewsky?s group at the Institute for Genetics (University of Cologne, Germany), he studied antigen presenting cells and their communication with T lymphocytes. Then, he shifted his interest to developmental neuroscience and joined the group of Prof Thomas Jessell (Columbia University, New York, USA). In the Jessell group, he investigated the role of the chemokine receptor Cxcr4 in CNS exit point choice, a crucial step in motor axon guidance. Together with Dr Hynek Wichterle, he also developed a method that allows the direct differentiation of motor neurons from embryonic stem cells. This approach has become an important research tool for scientists studying normal motor neuron development and degenerative diseases which affect motor neurons.

Links:

Thompson Reuters Researcher ID: C-5324-2009
KCL PURE: https://kclpure.kcl.ac.uk/portal/ivo.lieberam.html

Related News:

Manufacturing human iPSC-based neuromuscular circuits in compartmented devices

30/01/23
New findings from the Lieberam lab

Selected publications:

Harley P, Kerins C, Gatt A, Neves G, Riccio F, Machado CB, Cheesbrough A, R'Bibo L, Burrone J, Lieberam I (2023) Aberrant axon initial segment plasticity and intrinsic excitability of ALS hiPSC motor neurons. Cell Rep 42: 113509

Cheesbrough A, Harley P, Riccio F, Wu L, Song W, Lieberam I (2023) A scalable human iPSC-based neuromuscular disease model on suspended biobased elastomer nanofiber scaffolds. Biofabrication 15

Machado CB, Pluchon P, Harley P, Rigby M, Gonzalez Sabater V, Stevenson DC, Hynes S, Lowe A, Burrone J, Viasnoff V, Lieberam I (2019) In Vitro Modelling of Nerve-Muscle Connectivity in a Compartmentalised Tissue Culture Device. Adv Biosyst 3

Bryson JB, Machado CB, Crossley M, Stevenson D, Bros-Facer V, Burrone J, Greensmith L, Lieberam I (2014) Optical control of muscle function by transplantation of stem cell-derived motor neurons in mice. Science 344: 94-7